EXIT/SALIDA

Relationship between Elisabeth (Sisi), Empress of Austria and Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg

 

 

Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

 

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is a grandson of a 4th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Total: 265 relationship links :

 

Louis Engelbert de La Mark, Comte de La Marck 1701-1773
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Louise-Marguerite, Comtesse de La Mark 1730-1820 &1748
Charles-Marie, Duc d'Arenberg 1721-1778
  Marie Félice Charlotte de La Mark de Noailles, Comtesse de La Mark 1755-1827 &1778
August Johann Egon, Baron von Wernitz 1757-1805
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Louis, Duc d'Arenberg 1757-1795 &1788
Marie de Mailly 1766-1789
  Charles-Auguste (Wernitz-de La Mark de Noailles), Baron von Wernitz 1782-1860 &1808
Anne-Adélaïde-Victoria de Rouvroy, Duchesse de Saint-Simon 1784-1835
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Amélie, Princesse et Duchesse d'Arenberg 1789-1823 &1807
Pius von Wittelsbach, Herzog in Bayern 1786-1837
  Karl-Kurt-Maria, Baron von Wernitz 1810-1871 &1832
Auguste, Princesse de Montléart-Sachsen-Kurland 1814-1885
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Maximilian von Wittelsbach, Herzog in Bayern 1808-1888 &1828
Ludovika von Wittelsbach, Prinzessin von Bayern 1808-1892
  Frédéric-Charles, Baron von Wernitz 1833-1902 &1856
Marie-Madeleine, Baronesse Petróczy de Petrócz 1835-1898
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Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern 1837-1898   Jean-Nepomussene, Baron von Wernitz 1857-1930 &1886
Alexandra, Princesse Galitzine 1868-1954
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    Stephan Karl, Baron von Wernitz 1905-1981 &1937
Margarita zu Salm-Kyrburg, Princesse d'Hornes 1909-1995
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    Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes 1944-

More relationship: 

 

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a grandson of a 7th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a great-grandson of a 7th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 6th generation of a 6th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 4th generation of a 7th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a grandson of a 8th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 5th generation of a 7th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a great-grandson of a 8th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a son of a 9th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 4th generation of a 8th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a grandson of a 9th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a 10th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 5th generation of a 8th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a great-grandson of a 9th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a son of a 10th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 6th generation of a 8th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 4th generation of a 9th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a grandson of a 10th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 7th generation of a 8th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 5th generation of a 9th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a great-grandson of a 10th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 6th generation of a 9th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a grandson of a 11th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a great-grandson of a 11th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a son of a 12th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 4th generation of a 11th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a grandson of a 12th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 4th generation of a 13th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

Andreas von Wernitz zu Salm-Kyrburg, Herzog von Hornes is also a descendant of the 5th generation of a 13th cousin of Elisabeth von Wittelsbach (Sisi), Herzogin in Bayern.

 

 

Biography:

 

Elisabeth was born on Christmas 1837 in Munich, Bavaria, as the daughter of Duke Maximilian and Maria Ludowika, daughter of the Bavarian king. She grew up in Possenhofen castle  far from the ceremony of court, and developed like her brothers and sisters into an unconventional, freedom loving, and extremely sensitive person.


In the summer of 1853 at the scenic Salzkammergut town Bad Ischl she met Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria, who was actually supposed to marry her sister, Helene.

However, the Emperor defied his mother's marriage plans and fell in love with Helen's sister Elisabeth, then only 15 years old, who had accompanied the party rather accidentally. Already one day after their first encounter Francis Joseph and Elisabeth celebrated their engagement.
The engagement to Sisi was a sensation. Everyone wanted to know who she was. She quickly became a rising star.

The paparazzi of the day, the court painters and engravers were quickly producing pictures of this beautiful young duchess "Sisi". They married on 24th April 1854 in the Vienna Augustine Church. The festivites lasted for over a week.

In 1855, Sisi gave birth to a daughter, Sophie, and in the following year to another girl, Gisela. Finally, in 1858 the long-awaited crown prince, Rudolph, arrived.

With her charm and natural grace Elisabeth soon became a fairy-tale princess in the eyes of the public. In her private life, however, insoluble problems began to make their appearance. From the first day she arrived in Vienna the young empress felt constrained and unhappy by the strict life at court, personified by her mother-in-law, Sophie. During the early years of her marriage, Elisabeth took refuge in isolation and illness. Sisi could not adapt to the strict court etiquette, and soon immersed herself in rigourous exercise and horse riding. Later she spent a lot of time in Madeira and Corfu trying to escape. The official public explanation was "severe illness". Her children were forced from her and had to remain in the hands of her mother-in-law and the court.

After the birth of the crown prince, however, with whose education she was not entrusted, she broke into open rebellion. In 1859, Elisabeth left her husband and small children to live in seclusion on Madeira, Corfu, and in Venice.

The Empress had exchanged a carefree country life with the strict etiquette of the Imperial Court and could hardly adapt to it.

Francis Joseph loved his wife dearly, but he ruled over an empire of 50 million people and had little time to be with "Sisi" who felt lonely. "I wish he were no emperor", she confided her former governess.
After a lengthy interval due to marital problems, a fourth child, Marie Valerie, was born to the imperial couple. Marie Valerie was dubbed the "Hungarian child" because she was brought up and educated in the Hungarian language. The youngest offspring was a symbolic gift from the Queen-Empress to the Hungarian people who she loved so much. The new baby arrived exactly ten months after the coronation of her husband as King of Hungary, which Elisabeth had been so energetic in promoting.

Although Sisi usually stayed out of politics, she made a great exception as far as Hungary was concerned. Elisabeth's interest in politics developed as she grew matured. She was liberal and forward-minded. The empress placed herself decisively on the Hungarian side in the nationality conflict thereby making an important contribution to the historic compromise of 1867. Hungary's gaining an equal footing with Austria also strengthened the liberal element in the monarchy as a whole. Elisabeth attained an unparalleled position of respect and affection in Hungary, one which has lasted until the present day.

It was due to her influnce that the reconciliation with the rebellious peoples of Hungary was established. Elisabeth learned to speak Hungarian fluently and spent more time in Budapest then in Vienna, much to the anger and displeasure of her mother in law and her cohorts in the Viennese Court.

In the 1860's Elisabeth was considered the world's most beautiful monarch. In the 1870's she became the most famous, and probably also the world's best, female equestrian. She trained as hard as a professional sportswoman for years to achieve this goal. After the Hungarian compromise had been reached, Elisabeth had little choice but to withdraw from politics. Later when gout made riding impossible she tried to make a name for herself as a poet in the mold of Heinrich Heine, who she revered.

All of these efforts were meant to prove herself as an individual and not as an empress. They were at the same time an expression of Elisabeth's contempt for the monarchy, which she considered a "ruin". Sisi remained consciously individualistic and dedicated herself exclusively to her self-expression and physical beauty. Elisabeth was also a highly educated woman, who not only learned Hungarian and modern Greek perfectly, but who even in later years immersed herself in the world of the ancient Greeks. It was for this reason that she built a palace on the Greek island of Corfu and named it "Achilleion" after her favorite hero of the ancient world, Achilles.

Personal blows left heavy marks on the life of Austria's empress. She lost her daughter, Sophie, in 1857, and her favorite cousin, King Ludwig II of Bavaria, in a tragic fashion. Her brother-in-law, Emperor Maximilian of Mexico was shot by revolutionaries. She never was able to get over her most terrible tragedy, the suicide of her son, Rudolph, in 1889.

Her son dead, her favorite daughter happily married, her husband the Emperor was in a mutually satisfying relationship with a lady named Katharina Schratt, the Empress found herself alone and set out travelling in Italy and Greece.

Now invariably dressed in black, Sisi spent the last years of her life far from the pomp and ceremony of the Viennese court traveling widely, especially in Greece. Her decades-long hunger diets coupled with a need for movement and exercise which compelled her to undertake lengthy and strenuous hikes, caused malnutrition and depressions and led finally to suicidal fantasies. The sixty-year old empress was stabbed with a file by a twenty-four year old anarchist, Luigi Lucheni, shortly after noon on September 10, 1898 on the promenade of Lake Geneva as she boarded a steamship for Montreux. After the incident the Empress still walked for a few minutes. Because she was so strictly corsetted, she was unaware how seriously she had been wounded. Her last words were "What happened to me?"
For the assassin Elisabeth represented the monarchic order which he despised, but she was in fact simply a survivor, who tired of life looked forward to her own death.

Sisi (nickname for Elisabeth) was already a legend in her lifetime. And especially in Budapest (Hungary) many buildings or institutions are named after her, and Elisabeth is still the most often given girlname in Hungary. Even a century after her death, Sisi's hold on the popular imagination remains undiminished. This can be seen in the popularity of Sisi films and the musical "Elisabeth", which has run for years in Vienna. The sites where the empress lived continue to draw tourists from the world over. Among these are her apartments in Schönbrunn Palace, the Hofburg, and the Hermes Villa in Vienna, her tomb in the imperial burial vault of the capital's Capuchin Church, and the imperial villa in Bad Ischl, as well as many other places throughout Austria.

 

 


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